Christmas Live Stream Dec. 24 8pm Berlin time – die Weihnachtsgeschichte als Live Drawing

Bin ich eigentlich die einzige, die Weihnachten alleine ist? Vielleicht kann ich ja mit meinem Xmas Live Stream noch jemanden zur Kontaktreduktion überreden? Oder euch vor der Verwandtschaft oder awkward Spieleabenden mit Bekannten retten. Am 24.12 zur besten Sendezeit um 20 Uhr Berlin time zeichne ich euch live die Weihnachtsgeschichte, für alle die alleine sind und sich alternatives Entertainment wünschen. Einfach um 20 Uhr auf den Live Link klicken und dabei sein:)

Hier ist der Link zur Veranstaltung: https://www.facebook.com/events/728906241392648/

Und hier ist der Link zum Post vom Live Video: https://www.facebook.com/ingridwenze/posts/3897979946911559

Quasi ein Krippenspiel der anderen Art. Für alle, die an Weihnachten alleine oder sad sind, die Netflix und ARD durchgeschaut haben: An Heiligabend zeichne ich für euch live die Weihnachtsgeschichte (nach Lukas/Markus/Medley und auf deutsch mostly)

(Dieser Live Stream ist erstmal nur ein Experiment, deshalb erstmal nur auf Facebook)

Hier sind ein paar Videostills vom letzten Live Stream letzte Woche. Und hier der Link zum Nachschauen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuzdmJBPxfQ

 

“Cooking onions and playing Cyberpunk2077”
Drawing a ginger bread heart for your entertainment
View of my desk
Maestra
Advocating for a Böllerverbot
Arguing with a violinist
Singing a song written with blood
Live drawing before the show started

 

Open Studio Stream Dec 5th 8pm CET

 

In my second online workshop/lecture/comedy performance, I will show you how to craft low budget Christmas presents (for people you LIKE!). Bring some normal paper, some pens and scissors. Anyone can do this!

The live stream is free but I encourage you to donate to Comedy Café Berlin and help them stay alive! Comedy Café Berlin is one of the most important addresses for underground and innovativ comedy in Germany. Instead of spreading joy every day they have to be closed. So I will spread some joy for them online: this Saturday, 8 PM Berlin time.

The Comedy Café Berlin also got a whole new line of merch so you can show off your love for CCB in style!

Watch the stream on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/1382860605346843/posts/2048457288787168/

Watch on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/comedycb

Watch on YouTube:

Online Spendengala für die Klinik Clowns

Meine Illustrationen für die Klinik Clowns Performance

What a clown!

Diesen Monat haben wir eine Spendengala für den Dachverband der Clowns in Medizin und Pflege gefeiert. Ein online Event für alle und am Ende wurden insgesamt über 10000 Euro gespendet. Ich habe mit einer illustrierten Performance und Graphik Recording beigetragen. Hier sind erstmal nur ein paar Eindrücke von Social Media, die professionelle Aufzeichnung der Impulspiloten poste ich dann noch mal. Wer noch spenden möchte: macht das unbedingt schnell bis zum 31.12 dann könnt ihr es nächstes Jahr schon absetzen:-)))

Wie arbeiten Klinikclowns überhaupt mit Abstand? Ein Beispiel ist hier: klickediklick

The Clowns checking out my drawings : D

 

 

Als Stand-up Comedian bin ich natürlich Fan von allem Artverwandten. Ich habe auch selber mal bei mehreren Clown Workshops mitgemacht. Oft war ich die einzige „vom Fach“. Und immer war ich die Schlechteste. Warum? Weil Stand-up Comedians und Comic Zeichnerinnen einfach total verkopft sind. „Was könnte ich als nächstes Lustiges sagen“. Aber Clowns denken (so) nicht, sie fühlen einfach, from heart to heart. Imagine Stand-up Comedians working in hospitals, ugh kill me now! Let’s support these clowns

 

I can’t wait for the professional footage to replace my sad collage : D Danke an Chezame und Vaya Wieser-Weber for the pics tho : D

 

Update: Hier ist die ganze Spendengala, ab 2:29:19 ist mein Einsatz:

 

 

How to perform digitally

These past months I’ve been performing at digital art shows and virtual business events. Here’s what I’ve learned:

Invest in a basic set-up

Use a computer, avoid phones and tablets. 
Get some basic light: some have spots, which are easy to control. Softboxes make a cozy light, but take up more space. Some use rings, which are cheaper but also less flexible. Do some research what’s best for you, ask colleagues. 
Background: depending on the type of event I’d say find a neutral background. Sit on the „wrong“ side of the desk facing away from the wall. I personally find wallpaper charming so I did not buy a fancy background. I would advise against funky digital backgrounds, they make your hair look like distractingly bad photoshop and all I am thinking is “what is this person hiding???”.
Mic: get one. Do some research depending on budget and personal taste.  Or have at least a basic headset. 
Rule of thumb: a cable is always more reliable than wireless. But too many cables are hell. You will have to demummify every time you use the bathroom. Find the sweet spot for your own sanity. Mine is two. 
Get familiar with the audio settings of your computer and browser one day before the event. Ask the event organizer which browser they recommend for the video software.

Now you’ve prepared. Now let’s do the event.

Be always ready 

Virtual events are volatile. A speaker might not show up and suddenly you’re on earlier. And then you say „oh shit“ and the 1000 attendees heard you. Sometimes the technical team presses a wrong button and accidentally throw you on the livestream without you knowing. So when you’re on, you’re on.

The camera is never off

When you’re off, you’re on, too. Even though you turned your camera and mic off, people might still hear and see you. Yep, these video apps have been quite leaky so once a camera is directed at you, it might be taping you. Even if you do not see yourself, even if you turned your camera off. My advice: a post-it on the camera. Or smile erratically the entire time: 

 

Don’t make it weird

Yes, virtual events are weird. We all know it so you do not have to say it. It’s like at a show with only three people in the audience. If the host addresses how no one showed up, I want to leave immediately. The people who are there, in person or digitally, are at the right spot, at the right time. Now give them a feeling of appreciation and belonging. Don’t make it weird. If you feel weird yourself prepare yourself (see next points).

Do I look at them or at myself?

I do not know. Some only look at the camera (can be too intense), some only look at themselves (seems aloof). I like to let my eye wander, like I would at a live show. If I can control it, I place my own video under the webcam so it kinda looks like I am looking at the camera and can still control my performance if I feel like it.

 

Less is more

Attention online is limited even more. Anything that could distract from your performance will distract from your performance. I love a physical, powerful performance. But online, less is more. Sit still. No wild gesticulations. The audience’s internet might be low and then you just look like a glitch on the loose. Keep the volume even, do not give the people with headphones tinnitus. 

But too little is even less: Be aware of how you appear in the frame. Can you use the space creatively? A white shirt on white background? Boring. Also: Get a big fluffy brush and neutral finishing powder. Throw it on your oily spots. The audience does not need to be reflected on your forehead. The nurturing brush also helps against anxiety. 

What am I doing here?

You might ask yourself talking to yourself into the camera. Ask yourself instead: what do I want the (invisible) audience to say about my performance afterwards? Generally good advice for every performances. In the beginning of my career I would often hide in the venue’s bathroom after my performance to see what people really think of me. Ugh, I miss analog events. The plus side: you usually do not see your audience anymore and thus cannot focus on those faces, that tell you they hate you. Just imagine people being happy to be here with you. Think of what you have to say and why it is important. Then say it in a genuine, authentic, conversational way. No script reading or you will loose your audience to another tab open! 

 

Be experimental

This is all new to everyone (ok except to youtubers) and you might be able to create some unprecedented performance art. Do not listen to my advice or anyone’s. Make your own mistakes and become a one of a kind performer. Digital events are full of mistakes so the audience is also more forgiving of yours.

Did I miss anything? Tell me please.

 

Buy my magazine “Pools – comics, writings, personality tests”

My magazine „pools – comics, writings and personality tests“ is out now. 

You can order it by contacting me: ingridwenzel.de/kontakt/

It’s 28 pages. color print. english. 14,8 x 21cm.  12 Euro including shipping. It’s full of fun, jokes, stories, comics and other pool related stuff. I even drew my own advertisement in it and you can check out two personality tests.

I also made this video to show the work in progress.

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ingrid wenzel pools magazine

Los Angeles

In December I went on a field trip to Los Angeles and Northern California. I worked on stand-up notes, an illustrated diary (coming) and took these five photos that I (obviously) edited. While you are looking at them, why not think about seeing me live?

For example January 31th at Zinnschmelze Hamburg (Hamburger Comedy Pokal)!

In Bielefeld on February 22nd (Bielefelder Kabarettpreis)!

March 20th & 21th at Atelier Theater Köln!

Or basically every night in Berlin.

All dates are here: https://www.ingridwenzel.de/termine/

I do have a few days where I am not booked. If you need me to host a show, do a comedy set or draw illustrations, contact me.

Or check out my portfolio: https://ingridwenzel.myportfolio.com

Love,

Ingrid

Wenzel on Venice Beach. Not in this pic: My tenosynovitis (Sehnenscheidenentzündung) – due to a translation mistake I told everyone I have ARThritis.

 

Santa Monica Train Sunset with Fine Art. Next to me sat a dad with his child who yelled “I LOVE TRAINS” and I couldn’t agree more.

 

Freeway as seen from the Getty Center. It took me 2 hours by bus to get there (would have been faster walking). I got off the wrong stop on that freeway  and a Getty employee shuttle gave me a ride (thank you).

 

Classic Los Angeles Scent. (Breathtaking view from the Getty Center)

 

This is not me (yet).

 

Golden Gate Bridge. “All streets and sights here are called sunny or golden. German street names are named after poets who died in the 30 year war.”

 

This was Christmas Day. Normal Neighborhood. This is not a miniature. This is an actual house. Note the flag on the left. 

 

Photos of the Berlin Comedy Open Mic Scene

When I perform in small rooms, I like to take photos of the other comedians with my phone. I love catching intimate moments of pure concentration, anticipation and also introspection, solitude as well as joy and tender interchanges. Before they metamorphose to onstage personas.

The moments before a performance, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant, have something ritualistic, sacred to it. Comedians going over their notes look like they are praying.  Writing their new jokes on hands becomes a ceremonial tattoo. Nervously trembling back and forth looks like a walking meditation. The donation boxes taken from some apocalyptic church. 

And next to documenting the performer, the photos reveal the atmosphere of show room architecture and German interiors. Jazz cellars, East German pubs turned hipster cafes. Lastly, my goal is to document our comedy Avantgarde before we are all rich and famous (fingers crossed). Here are some snapshots I took last night at the weekly open mic Kottikomedy at Monarch, directly at Kottbusser Tor in Berlin.

Edit Sept.5: I was proud of my shots so I sent them to photographer Sergey Sanin for feedback. He edited some of them and now our church of comedy looks even more intense.

Paul Salamone (c) Ingrid Wenzel / edited by Sergey Sanin
Aurel Mertz & Thomas Kornmaier (c) Ingrid Wenzel / edited by Sergey Sanin
The donation jar (c) Ingrid Wenzel
Maria Clara Groppler (c) Ingrid Wenzel / edited by Sergey Sanin

How to make Cold Brew Coffee

When I stayed in California, I had this ritual. Every morning, I would walk up to this coffee shop, I forgot the name. I would order their iced coffee and start my day. I would take a walk, sit down on a bench, read and draw a bit under a tree, take a nap at the botanical garden and at night perform at an open mic. And then I already awaited the next day to repeat my ritual. Those were the happiest days, and they started with cold coffee. I was bewildered how they make it taste so smooth. The bitterness of coffee kept to a minimum, leaving no trace of brown coating on my tongue. Just gulping down brown, tasty water. How did these magicians do it? Today I know. It’s cold brew! It’s tastier than drinking cooled, old, bitter coffee from the day before. Today I make cold brew myself. It’s super easy! And cheaper than running to the coffee shop every morning, though I miss that ritual. That’s why I illustrated this autobiographical recipe for you from the first time I ever made it:

I refer to this first batch as the Cold Brew Disaster. From then on I never strained it as thoroughly ever again. I dump the coffee mix through a rough strainer, that’s it, and remind myself to stop drinking before I hit the viscous goo on the ground of my cup.

I drew this illustration with the app procreate. I can’t stress enough how much I love this app. I uploaded the time-lapse video of my drawing process here:

 

Animating Illustrations with After Effects

I took baby steps this month. Remember the time when your brain had to think about which foot to move where? I do, mentally, because I took an animation class. Animating a character taking step after step was hard! I’m an artist, no programmer. We follow rules only to break them. If I feel like it, I stick a pool cue in dirt and paint on a mattress. But with animation, every frame, every time cue, every movement has to be on point. You can’t conceal a computer program with a wet brush. I have so much respect for animated movies now.

I wanted to learn Adobe After Effects to elevate my .gif making skills but what I also learned was how to suppress my anger. If this had been an online course I’d be yelling at the program but I sat with other people in a class who didn’t know how lucky they were that I can contain myself.
We first started out animating a ball, which was so much harder than I could ever imagine. To keep my spirits up I gave my ball a funky face, as you can see below.
Getting deeper into the mechanics I actually had fun, because now I understand how to use it for animating my own illustrations. You can look at my experiments, my baby animation steps, right here. I’m partly embarrassed by the simplicity and at the same time so proud of them because now I know how complicated simplicity is. 

And here are some links to the program, if you are interested to check it out:
https://www.adobe.com/products/aftereffects.html (I’m just wondering why their featured gifs look so much more elaborate than mine, ha!)
https://ed.ted.com/series/?series=animation-basics (good basics!)
https://aescripts.com (more advanced stuff to see what’s possible)

The major eye roll gif above is pimped with a special jitter effect that I think is cool.
This next gif is part of a series of animations, partly taken from this After Effects tutorial:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgBo-00_GWc (I have to reduce the file size and quality, so my website won’t blow up):

 

Plus me as a fruit fly, possibly my best work of art ever:

Yes, there’s more. A classic horror story:

Okay, why not, lastly, here’s a video of a pig doing a make up tutorial when suddenly realizing they don’t need all this superficial crap to be happy:

 

 

As always, I’m happy about feedback. Do you like this? What AE tutorials did you enjoy? Which effects come in handy? Do we need more animations or do you prefer my analog drawings? I try to learn more about it now. Let’s see how long it takes until Pixar hires me, because I think my animated fruit fly is basically movie ready.

 

 

 

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