How to make Cold Brew Coffee

When I stayed in California, I had this ritual. Every morning, I would walk up to this coffee shop, I forgot the name. I would order their iced coffee and start my day. I would take a walk, sit down on a bench, read and draw a bit under a tree, take a nap at the botanical garden and at night perform at an open mic. And then I already awaited the next day to repeat my ritual. Those were the happiest days, and they started with cold coffee. I was bewildered how they make it taste so smooth. The bitterness of coffee kept to a minimum, leaving no trace of brown coating on my tongue. Just gulping down brown, tasty water. How did these magicians do it? Today I know. It’s cold brew! It’s tastier than drinking cooled, old, bitter coffee from the day before. Today I make cold brew myself. It’s super easy! And cheaper than running to the coffee shop every morning, though I miss that ritual. That’s why I illustrated this autobiographical recipe for you from the first time I ever made it:

I refer to this first batch as the Cold Brew Disaster. From then on I never strained it as thoroughly ever again. I dump the coffee mix through a rough strainer, that’s it, and remind myself to stop drinking before I hit the viscous goo on the ground of my cup.

I drew this illustration with the app procreate. I can’t stress enough how much I love this app. I uploaded the time-lapse video of my drawing process here:

 

Animating Illustrations with After Effects

I took baby steps this month. Remember the time when your brain had to think about which foot to move where? I do, mentally, because I took an animation class. Animating a character taking step after step was hard! I’m an artist, no programmer. We follow rules only to break them. If I feel like it, I stick a pool cue in dirt and paint on a mattress. But with animation, every frame, every time cue, every movement has to be on point. You can’t conceal a computer program with a wet brush. I have so much respect for animated movies now.

I wanted to learn Adobe After Effects to elevate my .gif making skills but what I also learned was how to suppress my anger. If this had been an online course I’d be yelling at the program but I sat with other people in a class who didn’t know how lucky they were that I can contain myself.
We first started out animating a ball, which was so much harder than I could ever imagine. To keep my spirits up I gave my ball a funky face, as you can see below.
Getting deeper into the mechanics I actually had fun, because now I understand how to use it for animating my own illustrations. You can look at my experiments, my baby animation steps, right here. I’m partly embarrassed by the simplicity and at the same time so proud of them because now I know how complicated simplicity is. 

And here are some links to the program, if you are interested to check it out:
https://www.adobe.com/products/aftereffects.html (I’m just wondering why their featured gifs look so much more elaborate than mine, ha!)
https://ed.ted.com/series/?series=animation-basics (good basics!)
https://aescripts.com (more advanced stuff to see what’s possible)

The major eye roll gif above is pimped with a special jitter effect that I think is cool.
This next gif is part of a series of animations, partly taken from this After Effects tutorial:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgBo-00_GWc (I have to reduce the file size and quality, so my website won’t blow up):

 

Plus me as a fruit fly, possibly my best work of art ever:

Yes, there’s more. A classic horror story:

Okay, why not, lastly, here’s a video of a pig doing a make up tutorial when suddenly realizing they don’t need all this superficial crap to be happy:

 

 

As always, I’m happy about feedback. Do you like this? What AE tutorials did you enjoy? Which effects come in handy? Do we need more animations or do you prefer my analog drawings? I try to learn more about it now. Let’s see how long it takes until Pixar hires me, because I think my animated fruit fly is basically movie ready.

 

 

 

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

 

Ein Beitrag geteilt von Ingrid Wenzel (@wenzelgram) am

RoboCup Junior at Ideenexpo 2019 in Hanover

I’m on Comedy summer break which means I have time for other tasks – yay!  These past two weeks I worked for one of the world’s biggest youth fairs: Ideenexpo 2019 in Hanover. It’s basically a playground for future professions with a focus on technology, science, crafts and IT. I was moved to see young girls and boys naturally play with the exhibits like car racing, explosive chemical labs, wild robot arms. I wished there would have been an Ideenexpo when I went to school. Maybe I would not have become a comedian but an aerospace engineer.

My job was to host certain programs on stage as a member of the Impulspiloten entertainment team. Amongst others, I interviewed animal ethicist Prof. Hoppe and he explained how to reduce animal testing and the ownership of experimental cells. Masons described to me how they can never walk past a construction sight without looking at what exactly they are building. And a young paramedic told us what’s it like for her to drive an ambulance and rescue people.

I hope to get photos from the fair soon but for now I do have one video. Next to all the experimenting, 500 girls and boys from 21 countries came to the fair to enter the contest RoboCup Junior. Their self-constructed robots competed in disciplines like soccer, rescue and onstage entertainment. It was pure joy! For the opening ceremony I was asked to illustrate and animate a video of all contesting countries. My main focus was to stress every country’s uniqueness without being too on the nose. And I did not double- but centi-checked every flag. Too bad I was not able to see the show myself but I was told later that the teams jumped up and cheered when they saw their country on screen and I might have shed a tear when I heard that. Here’s the full video: